State Of The Art Seminar

 
 

Speaker:

Apurba Dutta

Roll no.:

14209261

Title:

Biologically inspired Tape-copying Turing machines: interplay of accuracy and dissipation in Information Processing.

Date:

12 August, 2016

Time:

12:00 NOON

Venue:

FB 382 (Physics Seminar Room)

Abstract:

As is well known in molecular biology, genetic information is encoded by a specific sequence of four letters of an alphabet on DNA molecule. This information is "transcribed" first into RNA and subsequently "translated" into a language based on a 20-letter alphabet. The molecular machines that carry our transcription and translation are called RNA polymerase and ribosome, respectively. Both of these machines have similarities with Turing machine, introduced by Alan Turing as a hypothetical computing device. However, in contrast to the Turing machine concept used in theory of computation where the output are numbers, the output of the RNA polymerase and Ribosome are "tapes" just like the input. Therefore, these machines have been referred to as "tape-copying Turing machines". However, because of the intrinsic stochasticity of the processes carried out by these nano-machines, the computation is error-prone. The accuracy of the computation by these machines, depends on the entropy production, i.e., dissipation of energy in the kinetic proofreading process. However, higher accuracy, achieved at the cost of dissipating more energy, reduces the speed of the computation. Thus interplay of dissipation and accuracy in the information processing by the tape-copying Turing machines is a fundamental problem of non-equilibrium statistical physics. In this talk I will review some of the earlier works on the stochastic operation of RNAP and Ribosome from the perspective of Turing machines and their limitations.


Speaker:

Anupam Ghosh

Roll no.:

14109876

Title:

Occasional coupling synchronization of chaotic systems.

Date:

Wednesday, 3 August 2016

Time:

03:00 P.M.

Venue:

FB 382 (Physics Seminar Room)

Abstract:

One of the most important achievements in the field of nonlinear dynamics is the discovery of chaotic motion of dynamical systems. The term `chaotic' means that two trajectories in the phase space starting very close to each other exponentially diverge away from each other. Consequently, two chaotic systems evolving in synchrony might appear counter-intuitive in the light of this ultra-sensitivity to initial conditions.

In 1990, Pecora and Carroll reported that identical synchronization of two chaotic systems is also possible. Two chaotic systems are said to be identically synchronized when the systems eventually evolve identically owing to the coupling between them. Of course, in the absence of any coupling, these systems cease to be synchronized. Intriguingly, identical synchronization can be effected even if we couple two systems occasionally/intermittently/transiently. In this talk we shall discuss various occasional coupling schemes that are employed to synchronize two identical chaotic systems.


Speaker:

Anuj Ram Baitha

Roll no.:

14109875

Title:

Studies on plasma confined by a dipole magnet

Date:

12 July 2016 (Tuesday)

Time:

11:00 am (Tea at 10:45 am)

Venue:

FB 382 (Physics Seminar Room)

Abstract:

There has been a long quest to understand charged particle generation, confinement and underlying complex processes in a plasma confined by a dipole magnetic field. Our earth’s magnetosphere is an example of such a naturally occurring system. The dipole confinement concept was motivated by spacecraft observations of planetary magnetospheres that sets the stage for charged particles to cause a variety of interesting phenomena. The energetic particles trapped in the earth's dipole magnetic field provides a remarkable and non-intuitive process in the random variation of the interaction with the solar wind. Another important outcome is the emission from the Van Allen radiation belts. Unlike most other approaches to magnetic confinement, in which stability requires good average curvature and magnetic shear, the stability in a dipole derives from plasma compressibility. The plasma is found to be stable to interchange and ballooning instabilities, when the pressure gradient is sufficiently gentle, even when the local plasma pressure exceeds the magnetic pressure.

There are a few laboratory experiments worldwide, that have been designed for such investigations. The Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) developed by MIT, the Terella experiment at Columbia university, and the Ring Trap-1 (RT-1) experiment at the University of Tokyo, are some examples, that have provided excellent efforts towards this direction. However, they are very large scale experiments, where the dipole magnetic field is created with superconducting coils, thereby, necessitating power supplies and stringent cryogenic requirements. In order to carry out the present research, we have built a table top experiment to investigate several important processes in a dipole plasma, such as plasma production and transport, particle energy distributions, fluctuations and confinement. A strong permanent magnet having a surface magnetic field of more than 0.6 T, is employed to create the magnetic dipole field inside the vacuum chamber. The magnet is suspended and cooled by circulating chilled water. The plasma is heated by electromagnetic waves of 2.45 GHz. In addition, dual frequency heating in the range 6 – 11 GHz have also been planned. The wave powers can be widely varied from a few hundred watts (~ 300 W) in the continuous wave mode to a few kilo watts (~ 7 kW) in the pulsed mode, thereby providing a large flexibility in the heating scheme.

In this seminar, a brief review of research carried out on LDX, Terella, and RT-1 will be presented and scope for further research will be elucidated, including work that has not been carried out and our proposed work. In addition, the dipole plasma research carried out in our laboratory until now will be presented, with measurements and numerical results for magnetic field, first plasma, and preliminary investigations of plasma density and the electron temperature profiles.


Speaker:

Rohitashwa Chattopadhyay

Roll no.:

14109271

Title:

Collective behaviour of electrons

Date:

Friday, 24 June 2016

Time:

03:30 P.M.

Venue:

FB 382 (Physics Seminar Room)

Abstract:

Hamiltonian formulation is one of the most fundamental formalisms in physics. It is widely used as a starting point in the analyses of systems in classical, quantum, relativistic, and statistical mechanics. Hamiltonian for a conservative system is usually given by the sum of the kinetic energy and the potential energy. For a dissipative system, there is no unique way (if there is one at all) of writing a Hamiltonian, and a corresponding satisfactory Hamiltonian formalism is yet to be formulated. Lienard system is a general class of nonlinear systems that encompass a plethora of nonlinear dissipative oscillators (for e.g. van der Pol oscillator, Duffing oscillator etc.). In this talk, we shall discuss the various methods that are employed to formulate Hamiltonians for such nonlinear dissipative systems. We shall then discuss an oxymoronic implementation of canonical perturbation theory to find frequency and amplitude perturbatively for the van der Pol oscillator. Thus, we shall overcome the limitation of canonical perturbation theory that it can only be applied to conservative systems. We shall conclude this talk by touching upon the methods and the implications of quantizing nonlinear dissipative systems.


Speaker:

Krishanu SadhuKhan

Roll no.:

14109878

Title:

Collective behaviour of electrons

Date:

2nd June, 2016 (Wednesday)

Time:

11 a.m. - 12 noon (Tea from 10.45 am)

Venue:

FB 382 (Physics Seminar Room)

Abstract:

Collective behavior of electrons are surprisingly different from the single particle nature and become dominant when the particles strongly interact with each other and also with the surroundings. The huge density of electrons in an electronic system discards the possibility of understanding it in a direct quantum mechanical approach. Mean field theory provides an intermediate way where we use different models and approximations for the interaction potential and try to find the response of the system to different time dependent perturbation. Here we review the derivations of the response functions for different systems e.g. electron gasses and Dirac materials of different dimensions. The nature of the response function determines the possibility of finding a collective excitation mode which is a direct consequence of the collective behavior of electrons. In most of the cases we study the density-density response function and plasmons. Friedel oscillation is an interesting phenomenon where we find an asymptotic oscillatory behavior of the local density of electrons under impurity effects. This is also reviewed for different electronic systems.


Speaker:

Mr Amar Nath Sah

Roll no.:

14109883

Title:

Development of Portable Synchronous Fluorescence Spectroscopy Device for Early Cancer Diagnosis

Date:

20th May, 2016

Time:

4.00 pm (Tea @ 3:45 pm)

Venue:

FB 382 (Physics Seminar Room)

Abstract:

Biophotonics, the fusion of Photonics and Biology, involves the detailed study of the interactions of light with biological matter. Attempts have been made to detect cancerous and precancerous in-vitro and in-vivo lesions using Fluorescence spectroscopy over the past three decades. It has the ability to monitor the various metabolic and pathological changes related to the abnormal cells growth. It is a highly sensitive and accurate technique for detecting subtle changes in native fluorophore concentrations or the local environment in the tissues. These native fluorophores in turbid tissue include structural proteins, amino acids, coenzymes, lipids and porphyrin, whose contribution to the spectrum depends upon the choice of excitation and emission wavelengths. For human tissue, overlapping emission bands of multiple tissue fluorophores contribute to a single broad band fluorescence spectrum and mask signatures of certain fluorophores. So, vital information of individual fluorophore is difficult to extract and often missed. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) offers a simple way to decouple the activity of individual fluorophore in a single acquisition with the selection of an appropriate offset wavelength between excitation and emission wavelength. In my seminar I will discuss about light tissue interaction, fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, recent studies on synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, diagnosis of cancer and future aim of developing portable SFS device.


Speaker:

Ms. Meenaxi Sharma

Roll no.:

14109267

Title:

Lubricating Fluid Infused Slippery Surfaces: Basics & Applications

Date:

18/05/2016 (Wednesday)

Time:

11 AM (Tea @ 10:45am)

Venue:

FB 382 (Physics Seminar Room)

Abstract:

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Speaker:

Utso Bhattacharya

Roll no.:

14109885

Title:

Topological Quantum Systems and Dynamics

Date:

13th May, 2016 (Friday)

Time:

11 a.m. - 12 p.m.

Venue:

FB 382 (Physics Seminar Room)

Abstract:

A topological insulator is a quantum phase of matter with insulating bulk but conductive surface states. Examples include the anomalous quantum Hall effect (quantum Hall effect in the absence of a net magnetic flux) and the spin quantum Hall (SQH) effect. Having reviewed these special states of matter, we will introduce the notion of the Berry phase and curvature bridging a connection with the topological invariants (e.g., the Chern number and the Z2 invariant) those distinguish the topological phases from the trivial ones. A discussion of the Floquet theory which reveals the physics of periodically driven systems will finally set the stage for analyzing the stroboscopic dynamics of such driven or kicked Floquet insulators. Interestingly, novel topological edge states can be induced by shining electromagnetic radiation on a topologically trivial insulator with no edge state in the static limit. It is also possible to open gaps at the Dirac point of graphene and even drive graphene into the topological phase by simple irradiation with suitably chosen parameters. We will conclude with a brief mention of some of our works those have already been done pointing to possible future endeavors.


Speaker:

Poulami Nandi

Roll no.:

14109879

Title:

AdS-CFT and Holographic Superconductors

Date:

11th, May 2016 (Wednesday)

Time:

11:00-12:00 Hours

Venue:

FB 382 (Physics Seminar Room)

Abstract:

The AdS-CFT or the Gauge Theory-Gravity correspondence holographically relates a bulk theory of weakly coupled gravity in Anti de Sitter (AdS) spacetime with a strongly coupled quantum field theory on the boundary in certain limits. The various constituents leading up to this correspondence would be reviewed including its application to the understanding of holographic superconductors arising from such strongly coupled boundary quantum field theories at a finite temperature. We will conclude with a brief description of our investigation to holographically characterize this superconducting phase transition in the boundary field theory in the framework of thermodynamic geometry.


Speaker:

Tripurari Srivastava

Roll no.:

14109883

Title:

Impact of Scalars on Beyond Standard Model Physics

Date:

08/03/2016 (Tuesday)

Time:

3:00 PM

Venue:

FB 382 (Physics Seminar Room)

Abstract:

After discovery of Higgs boson at LHC, it has given hints for detection of scalars beyond standard model in near future. There are many BSM signatures at low scale such as muon g-2, charged lepton flavor violation (CLFV) decays,neutrino -oscillations etc. I will analyses muon g-2 and CLFV decays in context of doubly charged scalar. I will also present you the implication of di-photon excess observed recently at LHC run-2. I will briefly introduce the Left-Right symmetry model and analyses the scalar mass spectrum using vacuum stability and tree-unitarity bounds on couplings of scalar.


Speaker:

Amit Kumar Jash

Roll no.:

14109874

Title:

Exploring and imaging dynamic instabilities in the driven vortex state of a superconductor

Date:

23rd February, 2016 (Saturday)

Time:

12:00 PM

Venue:

FB 382 (Physics Seminar Room)

Abstract:

Vortex matter in type II superconductors provides a convenient system for the study of fundamental problems and as well as application oriented studies. In the vortex matter the density and interaction between vortices can be varied easily by changing the external magnetic field. The disorder in the vortex state can also be varied relatively easily. I will be discussing about two phenomena’s found in the driven vortex state. First, I will discuss about an old phenomena’ viz., the peak effect (PE) phenomena. While this phenomena has been well studied, origins of it are not well understood. Normally the current carrying capability, viz., the critical current density (Jc) of a type II superconductor should decrease monotonically with increase in temperature and magnetic field. However in a large variety of superconductors it has been found that in the PE regime, Jc abruptly increases close to the upper critical field of the superconductor. PE is considered to be associated with an order to disorder transformation in the vortex state, although as mentioned the origins of this phenomena are uncertain. Another phenomena is the newly discovered jamming transition found in the driven vortex state. In this phenomena a free flowing (FF) vortex state moving with a finite vortex velocity transforms suddenly into a state where the velocity goes to zero as a function of driving force. Such a phenomena is known as Jamming. The jamming phenomena has distinct signatures of a non – equilibrium transition where a transient time scale associated with the phenomena are found to diverge with a characteristic critical exponent. Under my thesis work I plan to search for superconductors where both these phenomena’s can be found simultaneously. I also plan to artificially control pinning center configuration carefully so that I can intentionally generate the jamming phenomena’s in the superconductor. Through such a study I hope to understand the above phenomena’s as well as search for connections between them. We would like to know whether these dynamical instabilities in the driven vortex state are generated by the injection of disordered states in the moving media. This work would also have an application angle as well, since we would like to search for new ways of controlling the current carrying capability locally in a superconductor and thereby search for device applications. Under my thesis I plan to employ magneto optic imaging studies, self field imaging and sensitive noise measurements techniques.


Speaker:

Vimlesh Kumar Vimal

Roll no.:

14109886

Title:

Entanglement and its dynamics in quantum spin systems

Date:

9th January, 2016 (Saturday)

Time:

11:00 AM

Venue:

FB 382 (Physics Seminar Room)

Abstract:

In recent years quantum entanglement of has been studied intensively because it has important application in quantum information processing. There are various approaches to detect entanglement in quantum state of a system, one such is concurrence. Using the concurrence measure, we will discuss entanglement and its evolution in Heisenberg XY model. In particular i will discuss a method to find concurrence in ground state of 1-dimensional Kitaev spin chain in transverse magnetic field.


Speaker:

Antu Laha

Roll no.:

14109261

Title:

Transport and magnetic properties of Ce-based Compounds

Date:

13th January, 2016 (Wednesday)

Time:

11:00 AM

Venue:

FB 382 (Physics Seminar Room)

Abstract:

Ce-based intermetallic compounds exhibits many interesting properties like heavy fermion, superconductivity, valance fluctuation, Kondo behavior, magnetic ordering. CeNi2Ge2 (Non- magnetic) and Ce2Ni3Ge5 (Antiferromagnetic) are two examples of Ce-based intermetallic compounds. CeNi2Ge2 shows a crossover from NFL to FL behavior at 250 mK and the NFL behavior is suppressed by high magnetic field or high pressure. It also shows large thermopower. On the other hand Ce2Ni3Ge5 exhibits two antiferromagnetic ordering at 5.1 K and 4.5 K. At high pressure (3.6 GPa) magnetic ordering is suppressed and superconductivity (Tsc= 0.26 K) is observed. In this seminar I shall present interesting properties of Ce-based intermetallic compounds including our own results on CeNi2Ge2 and Ce2Ni3Ge5.


Speaker:

Saikat Sur

Roll no.:

14109272

Title:

Nonlocal detection of quantum dynamical processes in spin chains

Date:

8 January 2016

Time:

11:00 AM

Venue:

FB 382 (Physics Seminar Room)

Abstract:

We study the dynamics of a one dimensional quantum spin chain evolving from unentangled or entangled initial state. At a given instant of time a quantum dynamical process (ex. measurement) is performed on a single spin at one end of the chain. The aim is detect whether the process occurred from a measurement on a far away spin. No communication theorem says it cannot be detected if there is no further evolution. From the dynamical evolution of the state from the epoch time we should be able to detect the occurrence of the dynamical process. We investigate the dynamics of the system from the epoch time, and from the evolution we determine how quickly the other sites 'receive' the information. Thus, we want to detect the speed of the communication that proceeds in the interacting quantum system. Intuitively, if the interaction is local, it is expected that the site, which is far from the ‘first’ one, feels the information at a later time compared to the near one. Obviously, the entire dynamics depends on the type of interaction of the system, strength of interaction among the spins and initial state of the system. It is also interesting to see how the speed depends on various parameters in the Hamiltonian of the system.


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Manohar Kumar Sharma
13109881
Effect of rotation on statistically homogeneous helical turbulent fluid
27 August 2015 (Thursday)
11:30 am
FB-382
Turbulence is a ubiquitous phenomenon but even the simplest of turbulent systems, viz. statistically homogeneous and isotropic turbulence (SHIT), is far from being completely understood. While there is no universally accepted definition of turbulence, usually presence of randomness, vortical structures and strong nonlinearity characterizes turbulence. In the inviscid and the unforced limit, the three-dimensional (3D) SHIT is further characterized by the presence of two globally conserved quantities: total helicity and total energy. When helicity and rotation are externally imparted on 3D SHIT, the situation becomes even more interesting and new physical phenomena emerge as seen both experimentally and numerically. The rotation effectively seems to make turbulence "two-dimensionalized" in some sense. Researchers have tried to unravel the reasons behind two-dimensionalization by using experiments, numerics as well as analytical arguments. In this seminar, apart from literature survey, I shall present the works I have been doing in this context. First I shall discuss the numerical results obtained using relevant low-dimensional shell models and direct-numerical-simulations. I shall discuss the effect of rotation on the dynamics of 3D SHIT through the statistics of the energy and the helicity fluxes, energy spectrum, ring spectrum, etc. Then, I shall touch upon analytical work: specifically, I will discuss exact results concerning third-order-structure-functions in the presence of helicity.


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Paramita Dasgupta Tewari
13109070
Extensive Air Showers and the Physics of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays
26th June, 2015
4 pm
FB-382
The origin of Cosmic Rays(CR) have been intriguing scientists since 1912 when V.Hess carried out his famous balloon flight to measure the ionisation rate in the upper atmosphere. The cosmic rays are energetic particles, which come to us from the outer space and are observed either through satellites or earth based detectors.The spectrum of Cosmic rays can be approximately described by a single power law from energy 10 GeV to the highest energies ever observed ~10^20 eV.During the last decade a significant progress has been made in experimental studies of high energy cosmic rays by means of extensive air shower (EAS) techniques. To a large extent this was due to a new strategy of data analysis, most consequently put forward by the KASCADE experiment.In this talk I will discuss about the particle interactions at ultra high energy using CORSIKA (Cosmic Ray Simulation for Kascade) simulation tools. With different particle interaction models employed, they significantly enhance the accuracy of data analysis, which allows us to obtain impressive results.

It is believed that supernovae (SN), supernovae remnants (SNR), pulsars, compact objects in close binary systems and stellar winds are sources to Cosmic rays(CR), but there is still some uncertainty about their origin. Cosmic-rays are energetic particles that have propagated for millions of years in the Interstellar medium (ISM). During this long period of time, the cosmic particles lose or gain energy and even change composition: CR nuclei can decay and become originators of secondary particles and electromagnetic radiation.

In the second part of my talk I will discuss The GALPROP code for cosmic-ray transport and diffuse emission production. Some results of our study on neutral and charged pion emissivity at different galactocentric radius and height will be presented at the end of my talk.


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Purna Chandra Patra
12209066
Optoelectronic Properties of Graphitic Carbon Nitride as 2D Material
28th May, 2015
4 pm
SCDT Seminar Room
Polymeric graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) is an emerging 2D material consisting of few atomic layers which has attracted much attention due to it's enhanced optical and electrical properties.
g-C3N4 consists of covalently linked sp2 hybridized C and N atoms in an alternating fashion. A variety of arrangements within planar structures are possible, though the actual structure realized in laboratory is still unclear. Heptazine based g-C3N4 is considered the most stable allotrope in ambient conditions which exhibits high chemical and thermal stability. We review the synthesis and optoelectronic properties of this material keeping in view of it's possible applications with focus on thin films. We will also report on some of our preliminary results on synthesis and characterization. Our aim is to explore its possible applications in flexible electronics.


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M M Vinay
13109077
Holographic Quantum Entanglement Entropy
21st May, 2015 (Thursday)
11 am
FB-382
Entanglement entropy is used in quantum information as a measure of the quantum entanglement in bipartite quantum states. It was conjectured by Ryu and Takiyanagi few years ago, that the quantum entanglement entropy has a holographic geometrical interpretation through the AdS-CFT correspondence. This correspondence in string theory holographically relates a bulk theory of gravity in Anti de Sitter (AdS) space time with a conformal quantum gauge theory at the conformal boundary in some limit. The Ryu-Takiyanagi conjecture will be reviewed and specifically its implementation in the context of AdS3-CFT2 will be described.


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Ashish Kumar
13109062
Magnetic Properties of Mn based Pnictogen Compounds
5th May, 2015 (Tuesday)
4.30 pm
FB-382
Recently Mn (d5) compounds such as LnMnXO (Ln=lanthanide, X=As,P) and BaMn2X2 (X=As, Bi,Sb) having same structure as transition metal pnictogen family have attracted considerable attention. These compounds are of interest as they have magnetic ordering like cuprates but their crystal structure is like iron pnictides. In this seminar, recent experimental investigations of magnetic properties of BaMn2As2, BaMn2Bi2, and LaMnPO compounds will be reviewed. Recent theoretical investigations of these systems starting with five band interacting electron model propose a rich phase diagram involving a variety of phases such as antiferromagnetic, stripe, flux, paramagnetic, and mixed phases


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Shubhajyoti Mohapatra
13109075
Magnetic Excitations in Frustrated Quantum Spin Systems
5th May, 2015 (Tuesday)
3.30 pm
FB-382
Recent investigations of magnetic excitations and correlations near quantum phase transition (QPT) in antiferromagnetic frustrated spin systems with competing interactions and/or geometric frustration will be discussed, focussing on magnetic field- and pressure-induced QPT in the three dimensional coupled dimer system TlCuCl_3. Magnetic excitations in this system involving triplon excitations are theoretically modeled using the bond-operator technique, and the magnetic field-driven QPT is described through Bose-Einstein condensation in the lowest lying triplon mode. Triangular lattice organic salts will also be discussed, highlighting the QPT arising due to complex interplay between electron correlation, effect of low dimensionality, and magnetic frustration.


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Sanghamitro Chatterjee
13109884
Plasma Based Low Energy Ion Beams: Extraction, Focusing and
Interaction with Matter
22th April, 2015 (Monday)
4 pm
FB-382
The application of low energy ion beams in science and technology has recently drawn attention of the scientific community. Low energy ion beams (0 – 5 keV) are interesting because of their unique interaction with matter. Unlike high energy beams, low energy ion beams do not penetrate deep into the substrate, but is confined within a few atomic layers below the surface, thereby bringing about interesting modification of material surface properties.

There are various methods of realizing low energy ion beams. A promising and useful technique is low energy extraction of ions from a plasma. In this research, a microwave plasma based multiple ion beamlet system (MIBS) capable of producing both broad beams (diameter ~ 1 cm) and focussed ion beamlets (diameter ~ 30 microns), developed in the laboratory will be utilized. The system provides control over each individual beamlet, to generate desired patterns on a substrate without employing a mask.

The characteristics of the plasma and the extracted ion beams in the MIBS have been investigated. At first, we have performed simulations on an inductively coupled plasma to understand the evolution of basic plasma properties like space potential, plasma density, electron energy distribution function, electron temperature, including phase space behavior of electrons and ions. From this study, we conclude that the discharge length (L) and pressure (p) are two important parameters that produce the same effect on discharge dynamics, a phenomenon named as “L-p similarity”. Thereafter, experiments are performed using the MIBS. While investigating the beam characteristics, it is found that the beam current profile is very similar to that of a vacuum diode, having two distinct regimes: (1) space charge limited flow regime and (2) extraction voltage limited flow regime. In the first regime, the profile deviates from the well-known Child-Langmuir law, whereas in the second regime, a Schottky-like behavior is observed, which is attributed to the fact that the collector potential actually perturbs the plasma potential through the plasma electrode apertures. The performance of the switching capable electrode for ion beam patterning has been investigated.

Finally, we expect to apply the low energy ion beams for modification of the electrical and field emission properties of Graphene and Carbon Nanotubes respectively. The development of a compact Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (MPECVD) system is proposed, for synthesis of these carbon based materials. A brief review on the structural, electronic, and morphological modification of these materials upon low energy ion implantation will be presented, followed by the plans for future research.


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Annwesha Dutta
13109061
Degeneracy in genetic code: causes and consequences of codon usage
bias
13th April, 2015 (Monday)
4 pm
FB-382
The genetic information stored in DNA is a living archive of instructions that a cell uses in sustaining and propagating "life". Nature has designed wonderful machineries for polymerizing such macromolecules (e.g. DNA, RNA, protein) using another biopolymer as the corresponding template. Translation is such a process by which a protein is synthesized from the information contained in a the sequence of nucleotides on a mRNA molecule. Each triplet of nucleotides on the mRNA template constitutes a codon. The genetic code is a set of rules by which a ribosome translates the sequence of codons on the mRNA into the sequence of amino acids, the building blocks of a protein. There are 61 distinct codons corresponding to 20 species of amino acids, which implies that the genetic code is degenerate i.e there are more than one synonymous codon code for the same amino acid. For some time after the discovery of genetic code, it was often believed that synonymous codons were used randomly. With the availability of more and more sequence data, it came to light that synonymous codon usage was non random and that different genomes have different preferred synonyms for any given amino acid. This phenomenon is termed as codon usage bias (CUB). My aim is to explain the evolutionary causes and physiological consequences of CUB using stochastic kinetic models. In this talk I'll begin by reviewing some proposed models for explaining the consequences of CUB. Then I'll briefly mention a theoretical model that I have developed very recently, capturing codon usage bias.


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Soumendu Ghosh
13109076
Polymerase traffic on nucleic acid tracks: effects of
stochasticity, queueing and interference
13th April, 2015 (Monday)
4 pm
FB-382
Nucleic acid strands, namely DNA and messenger RNA (mRNA) serve as templates for polymerization of "macromolecules of life". For example, a RNA polymerase (RNAP) synthesizes a mRNA strand which is complementary to a single-stranded DNA template. While polymerizing a RNA, the RNAP walks step-by-step on the ssDNA strand in a specific direction consuming input chemical energy. Thus, a RNAP can also be regarded as a molecular motor. A large number of such motors move simultaneously along the same track or on adjacent tracks; the collective movement of such motors on the template strand (track) is often referred to as traffic because of the superficial similarities with vehicular traffic. In this talk I'll first present an overview of the rules that govern these types of molecular motor traffic. Then I'll briefly present a theoretical model for RNAP traffic by incorporating the steric interactions between RNAPs and the mechano-chemical cycle of individual RNAPs during the elongation stage, including the possibility of RNAP backtracking. The results of this model explain the physical origin of the switch-like regulation of the two interfering genes in both co-directional and contra-directional traffic of the two groups of RNAPs


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Himanshu Gupta
13209861
Rayleigh-Benard Convection Problem in Intracluster Medium
24th March, 2015 (Tuesday)
3 pm
FB-382
Galaxy clusters are the largest known gravitationally bound structures which consist of very hot (10-100 Mega-Kelvin) plasma, called intracluster medium (ICM). This plasma is mainly composed of Hydrogen & Helium. In ICM, both of the species are fully ionized. ICM is a weakly magnetized (~1 micro-Gauss), weakly-collisional and high-beta plasma in which the anisotropic transport of heat and momentum, and diffusion of ions is predominantly along the direction of the magnetic field. It is well known that ICM can become convectively unstable via either magneto-thermal instability or heat-flux-buoyancy-driven instability.

This talk concerns with aforementioned two instabilities in ICM. I plan to review them and discuss the outcomes of the linear stability analysis performed on the equations governing ICM modeled as a Rayleigh-Benard set-up.


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Ashutosh Kumar Singh
13109879
Wave packet dynamics (collapse, revival etc.) and ultrafast carrier dynamics in
various two dimensional systems.
24th March, 2015 (Tuesday)
11 am
FB-382
This talk is divided into two parts. In the first part we will discuss about spontaneous collapse and consequent quantum revival of injected wave-packet in two dimensional systems with non-equidistant energy levels. Initially when a well localized wave packet is injected into a 2D system with non-equidistant Landau energy levels, it undergoes cyclotron motion and evolves quasi-classically for a number of cycles, with its probability density spreading around the quasi-classical trajectory. Non-equidistant nature of the discrete energy spectrum then leads to destructive quantum interference and consequently the collapse of the wave-packet. The collapsed wave-packet regain their initial waveform and oscillate again with the quasi-classical periodicity on a much longer time scale known as revival time.

In the second part we will talk about the carrier dynamics in Graphene under exposure to light beam which theoretically investigated either in the field theoretic language or is based on solving a set of extended optical Bloch equations obtained from time dependent Dirac/Schrodinger equation.


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Pramod Ghising
13109071
MFM Studies on Ferromagnets and superconductors
27 February 2015 (Monday)
12:00 Noon
FB-382


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Rajesh Tripathi
13109074
Low temperature properties of rare earth based ‘122’ phosphide
27 February 2015 (Monday)
11:00 am
FB-382


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Jitendra Kumar Pradhan
13109066
Infrared sensors based on Metamaterial Perfect Absorbers
23 Feb. 2015 (Monday)
4.00 pm
FB-382




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Rabeet Singh
12109066
Study of adiabatic connection in density functional theory
29 December 2014 (Monday)
10.30 am
FB-382


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Arif Warsi Laskar
1220963
Manipulating states of photons with atoms
20 November 2014 (Thursday)
10.30 am
FB-382


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Rajan Singh
12209067
Optical detection of a weak scatterer
19 November 2014 (Wednesday)
11 am
FB-382


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Ankit Kumar
12209062
High Jc states in Iron Pnictides
7 November 2014 (Friday)
11 am
FB-382


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Sourav Biswas
12209070
Thermal Instability and Phase Slips in Superconducting Weak Links.
22 October, 2015
3 pm
FB-382
A superconducting weak-link, such as a constriction, between two bulk superconductors can act like a Josephson junction and can sustain a super-current, determining the phase difference across the weak-link, below a critical current. The phase-dynamics in weak-links , particularly phase slip processes due to quantum and classical fluctuations, is yet to be fully understood. Such weak-links are used in micron-size superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), i.e. a sensitive detector of magnetic field. The characteristics of such devices are dictated by the phase dynamics in the weak-links. Current voltage characteristics of a weak-link shows hysteresis at low temperatures with a critical current and a re-trapping current, due to thermal instability. Since phase-slip processes generate heat and thus the details of heat evacuation from weak-link plays an important role in temperature and phase dynamics. Our recently reported time dependent thermal model found a new dynamic regime where the temperature and phase oscillate even in the thermally stable region and this gives rise to a new hysteretic regime. Heat evacuation and thermal stability in current carrying superconducting structures is of wider interest due to various applications. When a normal-superconductor interface is formed in a current carrying superconductor, its stability/instability is dictated by the efficiency of heat evacuation and this in turn determines the electrical transport properties and hysteretic behavior of different superconducting devices. In this talk I plan to review the phase slip and thermal instability in weak-links that control their current-voltage characteristics.


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Rajesh Kumar
12209068
Periodically patterned sculptured thin films for optical applications
20 October 2014 (Tuesday)
11 am
FB-382
Sculptured thin films (STFs) are three dimensional self-organized nanostructured materials that can be deposited to form well-defined structures by vapor deposition at large oblique angles. Periodically patterned STF (PP-STF) with spatially organized arrangements of the nano structures are made by deposition on pre-patterned substrates and show remarkable optical applications such as opticalactivity, surface enhanced spectroscopy, photonic crystal sensors etc. The large anisotropy and chirality in the optical response of STF make them potential candidates for incorporating in optical devices for control of polarization and directional emission/absorption. Large local field enhancements in metallic STF and the possibility of finely tuning their resonance through external means or fields makes them suitable candidates for surface enhance spectroscopic like surface enhance fluorescence (SEF) and surface enhance Raman scattering (SERS). In this seminar, I will begin by discussing the growth mechanisms of these PP-STF fabricated by glancing angle deposition technique and then describe some of the novel optical properties of these PP-STF. Finally, I will discuss about surface enhanced fluorescence and SERS from metallic sculptured thin films.


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Rameshwari Naorem
12209873
Scattering of electromagnetic radiation from disordered systems
14 October 2014 (Tuesday)
3 pm
FB-382
In multicomponent metallic alloys (like equimolar AlCuCoCrNi, MoCrFeNiCu & CuMnCoCrFeNi), configurational entropy may offset the tendency for compound formation to give rise to disordered solid solution(s). These alloys have been christened as high entropy alloys (HEA). The effect of the addition of multiple alloying elements to form a concentrated disordered solid solution on the x-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern is poorly understood. The role of atomic disorder and strain at the atomic level on the XRD pattern is also poorly characterized. Analogous to HEA with positional disorder one may envisage systems with orientational disorder, wherein the enhanced configurational entropy due to multiple orientational variants can stabilize a high symmetry phase, in spite of the strain in the lattice. In the case of the cluster compounds (of type AM4X8, where A is a trivalent atom like Ga, Ge or Al, M is a divalent transition metal and X is a chalcogenide), the strain arises due to Jahn-Teller distortion of tetrahedral clusters of transition metal ions. Further, compounds with both positional and orientational disorder can be envisaged. The effect of this combined disorder in cluster compounds on the XRD patterns and on structural, magnetic and transport properties are yet to be studied critically. Systems with orientational disorder of multiple origins (structural and spin) have not been studied in detail either from a stability perspective or from a scattering perspective. On a larger length scale (optical wavelengths) chiral structures have been synthesized for many applications like antennas and arrays, antenna radome and waveguides. Scattering of coherent light waves from systems with chiral disorder offers interesting possibilities.


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Mohammad Zaffar
12109873
Mueller matrix Imaging in human tissue
29 August, 2014 (Friday)
10:30 am
FB-382

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Abstract:

Khun Sang Phukon
12109065
Gravitational Wave Detection And Parameter Estimation
3rd June, 2014 (Tuesday)
4 pm
FB-382
There has been a worldwide effort to detect gravitational waves using ground based laser interferometer detectors. Inspiralling compact binaries in close orbits are the most promising and well-understood astrophysical sources of gravitational waves in the frequency band which may observable at these detectors. Gravitational waves will be detected by the method called match filtering, i.e, by correlating detectors output with a set a theoretical waveform templates. I will discuss the geometric formalism used to generate templates in the parameter space. Post detection accurate estimation of parameter is essential. For estimation of parameters and the associated errors, Fisher matrix based analysis can be followed. I will address effects corresponding to detector sensitivity, detector bandwidth and implications of higher order PN phasing corrections to template in parameter estimation.


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Pritam Kumar Roy
13109882
Harnessing Elastic Instabilities in Soft Matter
2nd June, 2014 (Monday)
4 pm
FB-382


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Abstract:

Suchita
12109876
Slow light: processes and applications
16 May 2014 (Friday)
11:30 pm
FB-382
Slow light is the propagation of light in a medium under reduced group velocity conditions. In earlier work, this has been studied in various media and structures. All these studies have one common feature, which is a sharp resonance peak, which leads to the modification of the group index and hence the group velocity. In this seminar, Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) based slow light is being presented. SBS, a nonlinear optical effect, is easily observed in optical fibers at very low input powers. SBS gain region gives the variation in refractive index of the medium and hence generates the slow light effect. SBS has both gain and loss regions depending upon the operating wavelength/frequency region which provides the positive as well as negative optical time delay. This property of SBS makes it more efficient than other sources of slow light generation in optical fibers. There are also certain limitations in SBS which requires a detailed study to improve the effect. Slow light has many potential applications in optical communication networks, quantum computing, information storage and ultrafast information processing.


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Tanmay Maji
12209874
Transverse momentum Dependent Parton Distribution functions
09 May, 2014 (Friday)
12:30 pm
FB-382
Transverse Momentum Dependent(TMD) parton densities are the 3-dimensional generalizations of the standard Parton Distribution functions (PDFs). Many recent experiments on Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS) and Drell-Yan processes suggest that the collinear picture of fast moving hadrons is not sufficient and one equires to investigate the hadronic structure involving partons with transverse momentum distributions. The TMDs are function of lightcone momentum fraction, square of momentum transferred and the intrinsic transverse momentum of the parton. In leading twist, there are eight altogether eight TMD PDFs. Calculation of TMDs from first principle in QCD requires nonperturbative techniques. Till now, TMDs are generally evaluated in different models. In this talk, I'll discuss some recent theoretical results of TMDs. Our future plan is to investigate the TMDs using LightFront Wave Function Formalism as well as in AdS/QCD.


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Abstract:

Kamalika Nath
12109872
Investigation of magnetic properties and their configurations in low dimensional magnetic structures
25 April, 2014 (Friday)
5:30 pm
FB-382
The talk will present an overview of recent results on the behaviour of magnetism in low-dimensional magnetic structures. Typical results related to different magnetic configurations in nano-structures,competition between different energy scales like magneto-crystalline and shape anisotropy and their effect on different quantities,viz., the coercive field, saturation fields, shape of hysteresis loops etc. in these nano-structures will be discussed. Some results relating to the manipulation of domain walls,domain wall pinning and experimental techniques used in these investigations, will be reviewed. Some results on developing low dimensional magnetic structures and studying their properties developed in the lab will also be presented in the seminar.


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Abstract:

Shailendra Kumar Rathor
12109874
Fluid Instabilities and Long-term Evolution of Intracluster Medium
25th April, 2014 (Friday)
12 pm
FB-382
In the past two decades, instabilities in intracluster medium (ICM) permeating every galaxy cluster has become a topic of active research in astrophysics. The presence of a weak magnetic field in ICM changes the dynamical stability of the system dramatically. In this talk, ICM will be modeled as a thermally stratified weakly-collisional plasma layer. The curious role of the anisotropy due to weak magnetic field on the heat flux in ICM will be highlighted. Such an anisotropy is responsible for introducing some interesting instabilities e.g magnetothermal instability (MTI), and heat-flux driven buoyancy instability (HBI). It will be seen that further consideration of anisotropy in pressure tensor has unignorable effects. We shall also discuss the dynamical stability of dilute plasma in the light of simultaneous presence of the thermal and the compositional stratifications. Finally, I shall elaborate on my immediate and long-term plans towards the successful completion my intended Ph.D. work.


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Mr. Anmol Thakur
12109063
Transport and many body effects in Low dimensional systems
10th April, 2014 (Thursday)
11 am
FB-382
We study the low energy collective modes for 2D systems with spin-orbit coupling.The electric transport and spin dynamics in such systems is related by an operator identity at lower energies.The identity relates the electric current to in-plane spin degree of freedom, which in the presence of electron electron interactions leads to an undamped spin plasmon mode whose dispersion is similar to that of a sound mode. We study the spin plasmon mode, in the presence of both - short ranged and long ranged interaction. We next want to explore the effect of static disorder on such modes.
In addition, we have also studied the transport phenomena in low dimensional system using Landeur-Buttilker formulae and Non Equilibrium Green's function approach which is now a most commonly used tool in the transport study of nano-dimensional MOSFETS and other devices. We plan to apply such techniques to study transport properties of hybrid superconducting systems in the future.


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Mr. Raghawendra Kumar
12109067
Controlling light using optical nano-antennas
9th April, 2014 (Wednesday)
4 pm
FB-3872
Confinement of light to small volumes is of great importance for many applications ranging from solar concentrators, fluorescent enhancements, subdiffraction imaging etc. Nano-antennas provide a convenient way to manipulate light and enhance a range of linear and nonlinear phenomena. Nano-antennas can create intense, localized field distributions or enable coupling to highly subwavelength objects, which is generally not possible by optical components such as mirrors, lenses and gratings. In this seminar, I will give a basic introduction of optical nano antanna, and how it is used to concentrate light into sub-diffraction volumes. I will also describe a two-photon polymerization technique to fabricate 3D micro and nanostructures, which will be used to fabricate nano-antennas . I will focus on the enhancement and coupling of fluorescence from single molecules using these antennas. 


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Abstract:

Anil Kumar Singh
12109062
Local electronic properties of graphene
9th April, 2014 (Wednesday)
3 pm
FB-382
Graphene, a single layer of graphite, has raised extensive interest in a wide scientific community for its extraordinary thermal, mechanical, electrical and other properties. In particular, due to its high mobility graphene has been considered as a candidate material for applications in post-silicon electronics. In this seminar, I shall discuss some of the experiments probing the local and bulk electronic properties of graphene and the factors affecting these properties. In particular, the effect of back-gate, disorder, proximity to different materials (such as normal metal, superconductor), chemical dopants will be reviewed. I shall also present our plan on investigating the local electronic properties of graphene using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy.


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Abstract:

Shamik Ghosh
12109875
Beyond the Cosmological Principle
31st March, 2014 (Monday)
11 am
FB-382
Cosmological Principle is the fundamental assumption of homogeneity and isotropy of space in the Standard Model of Cosmology. In the talk I will first discuss the Cosmological Principle and justify its importance towards building the Standard Model of Cosmology. I will briefly discuss the Standard Model and explain its success before proceeding to show the persistent anomalies when fitting experimental data. These anomalies require us to check the validity of the Cosmological Principle. I will then present various partially successful attempts to explain the anomalies observed in the data. These include local scale modification of observables due to secondary effects, phenomenological models and inflationary models.

Finally I will discuss some work that I have done in this field and the possible avenues that can be taken towards understanding the phenomena and building an appropriate model.


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Ritu Gupta
12109068
Proximity effect at Ferromagnet-Superconductor interface
7th March, 2014 (Friday)
12 pm
FB - 382


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Dipanwita Ghanti
12109871
Collective force generation by microtubules and molecular motors.
5th March, 2014
4 pm
FB - 382


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Date:

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Anshuman Dey
11109063
AdS/CFT correspondence and a Generalized Holographic Superconductor with Higher Derivative Couplings.
5th March, 2014
3 pm
FB -382


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Biplab Dutta
11109862
Anisotropy in Turbulent Flows
19th February, 2014 (Wednesday)
12 pm
FB - 382


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Alestin Mawrie
12109061
Novel phenomena in spin-orbit coupled fermionic systems.
21st February, 2014
11 am
FB -382


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Pavan Kumar
11209067
Microtubule polymerization kinetics: effects of structure and energetics.
29 November, 2013 (Friday)
12 pm
FB - 382


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Abhishek Juyal
11209061
Electrical manipulation and detection of domain walls in nanomagnets
15th November, 2013
10 am
FB - 382


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Vinay Kumar Shukla
11209068
Interfaces: An alternative route to magnetoelectricity
15th November, 2013
9 am
FB-382


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Vijay Singh
Y10209067
Investigation of Electric and Magnetic Properties of Compositionally Modulated Gallium Ferrite.
12 November, 2013
5 pm
FB-382


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Alekha Chandra Nayak
11209062
ELKO fermions
8 November 2013 (Friday)
12 pm
FB-382


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Dipak Rout
11209064
Light-matter interaction in dielectric and metallo-dielectric photonic crystals.
18th October, 2014
10 am
FB - 382

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Dibya Jyoti Sivananda
11109867
Unusual vortex states in ferromagnetic - superconducting heterostructures.
4th June,2013 (Tuesday)
11 am - 12 pm
FB-382


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Sumeet KD
11109865
12 pm - 1 pm
30th April, 2013 (Tuesday)
12 pm - 1 pm
FB-382


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Chandan Mondal
11109864
Proton GPDs in light front holographic QCD.
18th April, 2013 (Thursday)
12 pm - 1 pm
FB-382


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Sayandip Ghosh
11109869
Magnetism and Superconductivity in Iron Pnictides and Chalcogenides.
17th April, 2013 (Wednesday)
4 pm - 5 pm
FB-382


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Rahul Kothari
11109068
Poincare Gauge Theory of Gravity
15th April, 2013
12 pm - 1 pm
FB-382


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Ankur Rastogi
Y7109063
Electronic Transport in 2–Dimensional Electron Gas at the Interface of Insulating Perovskite Oxides.
12th April, 2013 (Friday)
11 a - 12 am
FB-382


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A Kani Mohamed
11109861
Polarization rotation based magnetometry
25th March, 2013
4 pm - 5 pm
FB-382


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Abhishek Kumar
11109062
Turbulence in thermally induced flows
15th March, 2013 (Friday)
12 pm - 1pm
FB-382


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Ummer K.V.
10109070
Control of emission in crystalline photonic nanostructures.
14th March, 2013 (Thursday)
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm
FB-382


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Mr. Gyanendra Singh
Y5109067
Spin reorientation transition and superconductivity in NbN based ferromagnet-superconductor thin film heterostructures.|
9th Fubruary, 2013 (Saturday)
12 pm - 1 pm
FB-382


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Mr. Jitesh Barman
Y11109868
Electrowetting induced morphological transition on topographically structured substrates.
6th February, 2013 (Wednesday)
11 am - 12 pm
FB-382