Twentieth National Conference on Communications                               (NCC-2014)
UPDATES

  

    - Photo Gallery                 : [Link]

    - Plenary Talks - Video Archive
      (Recommended using Chrome)

Prof. Prakash Narayan : [Link]
Prof. Sabine Susstrunk : [Link]
Prof. Gerhard Fettweis : [Link]
Prof. Lajos Hanzo : [Link]
Prof. Robert Heath : [Link]
Prof. P. R. Kumar : [Link]

 

    - Official NCC 2014 Android App

      Google Play Store : [Link]

      Direct Download    : [Link]  

 

    - List of registered participants
      (as of Feb 27, 2014)

 

    - Accomodation list

 

    - Best paper awards [PDF]    

 

 

IEEE Xplore

 

The accepted full papers will be published in the conference proceedings and submitted for inclusion in IEEE Xplore. Accepted full papers will be submitted for indexing to multiple abstract and indexing partners

 

GOLD

SPONSORS

 

 

 

Department of Electronics and Information Technology (DEITY), Govt. of India

 

SILVER

SPONSORS

 

Science and Engineering Research Board (SERB), Department of Science and Technology (DST),
Govt. of India

 

 

 

 

 

TECHNICAL
CO-SPONSORS

 

 

 

 

NCC 2014 INVITED SPEAKERS

 

Speaker

Affiliation

Title

Timings

Venue

Prof. P. R. Kumar Texas A&M University, USA

Packets with deadlines: A foundational framework for delay-based quality of service

Feb 28, 2014

18:30 - 19:30

Outreach Auditorium
Prof. Prakash Narayan University of Maryland, College Park, USA The Poisson Communication Channel

March 1, 2014

08:15 - 09:15

L-16
Prof. Lajos Hanzo University of Southampton,UK The Fifth MIMO: Space-Time-Frequency Shift-Keying

March 1, 2014

09:15 - 10:15

L-16
Prof. Robert Heath University of Texas, Austin, USA Coverage and Capacity Analysis of mmWave Cellular Systems

March 1, 2014

17:05 - 18:05

L-16
Prof. Gerhard Fettweis Technische Universität (TU) Dresden, Germany Designing the Physical Layer of 5G Cellular for Enabling The Tactile Internet

March 2, 2014

08:15 - 09:15

L-16
Prof. Sabine Susstrunk École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne(EPFL), Switzerland Moving beyond RGB

March 2, 2014

09:15 - 10:15

L-16

 

KEYNOTE/PLENARY TALKS INFORMATION

 


 

 

Prof. P.R Kumar
Texas A&M University,   USA
 
Title : Packets with deadlines: A foundational framework for delay-based quality of service
Chair : Adrish Banerjee
Date : Feb 28, 2014
Timings : 18:30 - 19:30
Venue : Outreach Auditorium
     

Abstract:
There is increasing interest in supporting applications that require guarantees on packet delays over wireless networks. In several of these emerging applications, packets lose value if they are not delivered within a specified time. Examples are interactive video and the emerging area of cyber-physical systems where control loops are closed over wireless networks.

This necessitates the development of a fundamental framework for understanding how to support applications with per-packet deadlines. The applications may additionally also require a guaranteed throughput of packets that are delivered on time. The regularity of packet deliveries may be an additional property of interest. The framework needs to take into account the fact that all these guarantees are required to be provided over the unreliable wireless medium that is subject to packet losses.

We present such a framework that characterizes what QoS guarantees can be supported when traffic is inelastic, as well as how to optimize utilization of the medium when throughputs are elastic.

[Joint work with Rahul Singh, I-Hong Hou and Vivek Borkar].

 


Bio:

P. R. Kumar has worked on problems in game theory, adaptive control, stochastic systems, queueing networks, manufacturing systems, wafer fabrication plants, simulated annealing, machine learning, and information theory. His research is currently focused on power systems, wireless networks, and cyberphysical systems. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering of the USA, and the Academy of Sciences of the Developing World. He was awarded an honorary doctorate by ETH, Zurich. He received the Outstanding Contribution Award of ACM SIGMOBILE, the IEEE Field Award for Control Systems, the Fred W. Ellersick Prize of the IEEE Communications Society, and the Donald P. Eckman Award of the American Automatic Control Council. He is a Fellow of IEEE. He is a D. J. Gandhi Distinguished Visiting Professor at IIT Bombay, and an Honorary Professor at IIT Hyderabad. He was a Leader of the Guest Chair Professor Group on Wireless Communication and Networking at Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. He was awarded the Daniel C. Drucker Eminent Faculty Award from the College of Engineering at the University of Illinois, the Distinguished Alumnus Award from IIT Madras, and the Alumni Achievement Award from Washington University in St. Louis.

 

Go to top     Go to the technical program page →

 



Prof. Prakash Narayan
Vodafone Chair Professor
University of Maryland, College Park,   USA
 
Title : The Poisson Communication Channel
Chair : Ajit Chaturvedi
Date : March 1, 2014
Timings : 08:15 - 09:15
Venue : L-16 (Lecture Hall Complex)
     

Abstract:
The Poisson channel model is an apt representation of a direct-detection dark-current-limited optical communication link. The input to the channel controls the instantaneous rate of a Poisson point process at the photodetector output. Additionally, in a free-space optical communication link, atmospheric turbulence causes random variations in the refractive index of air at optical wavelengths, resulting in optical ``fading" that can be combatted by adaptive power control and MIMO techniques as in RF communication. This talk will survey the information theory of the Poisson channel, and implications for optical communication.

 

Bio:

Prakash Narayan received the B.Tech. degree in Electrical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, and the M.S. and D.Sc. degrees in Systems Science and Mathematics, and Electrical Engineering, respectively, from Washington University, St. Louis, MO.

He is Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Maryland, College Park, with a joint appointment at the Institute for Systems Research. He has held visiting appointments at ETH, Zurich, the Technion, Haifa, the Renyi Institute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Universitat Bielefeld, LADSEB, Padova and the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore.

Narayan's research and teaching interests are in multiuser information and communication theory, cryptography, broadband communication networks, and information theory and statistics. He has served as Associate Editor for Shannon Theory for the IEEE Transactions on Information. Theory and is currently on its Executive Editorial Board. He was a member of the Board of Governors of the IEEE Information Theory Society, and is a Fellow of the IEEE.

 

Go to top     Go to the technical program page →

 


 

Prof. Lajos Hanzo
 University of Southampton, United Kingdom
 
Title : The Fifth MIMO: Space-Time-Frequency Shift-Keying
Chair : Ajit Chaturvedi
Date : March 1, 2014
Timings : 09:15 - 10:15
Venue : L-16 (Lecture Hall Complex)
     
 

Abstract:
The classic Shannon-Hartley law suggests that the achievable channel capacity increases logarithmically with the transmit power, which is not a 'good deal'! More beneficially, the MIMO capacity increases linearly with the number of transmit antennas, provided that the number of receive antennas is equal to the number of transmit antennas. With the further proviso that the total transmit power is increased proportionately to the number of transmit antennas, a linear capacity increase is achieved upon increasing the transmit power, which justifies the spectacular success of MIMOs.

However, there are huge challenges, which have to be tackled, before these 'massive MIMOs' might become an off-the-shelf reality.  For example, estimating all the (N x M) MIMO channels imposes a potentially excessive complexity, hence - perhaps somewhat surprisingly owing to its potential performance erosion - non-coherent detection might become an attractive low-complexity solution, as demonstrated in this lecture.

Another challenge is the provision of numerous Radio-Frequency (RF) chains, which is THE most costly part of a transceiver. This problem might be circumvented with the aid of Spatial Modulation (SM), where only a single one or a limited fraction of the transmit antennas is activated during any symbol interval. This 'win-win saga' continues, since apart from the potential benefit of requiring only a single RF chain, SM is also capable of implicitly conveying extra bits by inferring say log_2(M) bits from the specific index of the activated transmit antenna, as discussed in this light-hearted overview

 

Bio:

Lajos Hanzo (http://www-mobile.ecs.soton.ac.uk) FREng, FIEEE, FIET, Fellow of EURASIP, DSc received his degree in electronics in 1976 and his doctorate in 1983.  In 2009 he was awarded the honorary doctorate ``Doctor Honoris Causa'' by the Technical University of Budapest.  During his 37-year career in telecommunications he has held various research and academic posts in Hungary, Germany and the UK. Since 1986 he has been with the School of Electronics and Computer Science, University of Southampton, UK, where he holds the chair in telecommunications.  He has successfully supervised 80+ PhD students, co-authored 20 John Wiley/IEEE Press books on mobile radio communications totalling in excess of 10 000 pages, published 1300+ research entries at IEEE Xplore, acted both as TPC and General Chair of IEEE conferences, presented keynote lectures and has been awarded a number of distinctions. Currently he is directing a 100-strong academic research team, working on a range of research projects in the field of wireless multimedia communications sponsored by industry, the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) UK, the European Research Council's Advanced Fellow Grant and the Royal Society's Wolfson Research Merit Award.  He is an enthusiastic supporter of industrial and academic liaison and he offers a range of industrial courses.  He is also a Governor of the IEEE VTS. During 2008 - 2012 he was the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Press and a Chaired Professor also at Tsinghua University, Beijing.  His research is funded by the European Research Council's Senior Research Fellow Grant.  For further information on research in progress and associated publications please refer to http://www-mobile.ecs.soton.ac.uk Lajos has 18 000+ citations.

 

Go to top     Go to the technical program page →

 


 

Prof. Robert Heath,
University of Texas, Austin,   USA
 
Title : Coverage and Capacity Analysis of mmWave Cellular Systems
Chair : V. Sinha
Date : March 1, 2014
Timings : 17:05 - 18:05
Venue : L-16 (Lecture Hall Complex)
     

Abstract:
Millimeter wave (mmWave) spectrum may be the solution to the spectrum gridlock in cellular systems. mmWave systems overcome potentially high pathloss by using large antenna arrays at both the transmitter and receiver, to provide enough beamforming gain to reverse, if not benefit from, the effects of the higher carrier. In this talk, we introduce the concept of mmWave cellular systems. Then we examine the system-level performance of mmWave cellular systems with a special focus on coverage and capacity. This talk presents an analysis of mmWave cellular systems using the mathematical framework of stochastic geometry, which has been used to analyze microwave cellular and ad-hoc networks. The analysis incorporates mmWave's key differentiating factors such as the limited scattering nature of mmWave channels, and the use of RF beamforming strategies (also known as beam steering) to provide highly directional transmission with limited hardware complexity. To model mmWave signals' increased susceptibility to signal blockage (shadowing) in urban environments, an exciting new tool is leveraged known as random shape theory to model blockages due to buildings. The results show that, in general, coverage in mmWave systems can rival or even exceed coverage in microwave systems assuming that the link margins promised by existing mmWave system designs are in fact achieved. This comparable coverage translates into a superior average rate performance for mmWave systems as a result of the larger bandwidth available for transmission.

 

Bio:

Robert W. Heath Jr. received the Ph.D. in EE from Stanford University. He is a Cullen Trust for Higher Education Endowed Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin and Director of the Wireless Networking and Communications Group. He is also the President and CEO of MIMO Wireless Inc and Chief Innovation Officer at Kuma Signals LLC. Prof. Heath is a recipient of the 2012 Signal Processing Magazine Best Paper award and the 2011 and 2013 EURASIP Journal on Wireless Communications and Networking best paper awards. He is a licensed amateur radio operator, a registered Professional Engineer in Texas, and is a Fellow of the IEEE.

 

Go to top     Go to the technical program page →


 

Prof. Gerhard Fettweis
Vodafone Chair Professor
Technische Universität (TU) Dresden, Germany
Title : Designing the Physical Layer of 5G Cellular for Enabling The Tactile Internet
Chair : Abhay Karandikar
Date : March 2, 2014
Timings : 08:15 - 09:15
Venue : L-16 (Lecture Hall Complex)
     

Abstract:
Cellular communications as we know it today has been shaping the planet in an unprecedented way. Today the vast majority of people on the globe are connected due to cellular, and with current technology devices are becoming connected as well. Its success has flattened the planet and enabled economies to participate in the global economy, being the basis for many countries to become major players in world-wide trade and business.

 

So far we have seen that cellular enables content of different categories to be moved around the globe, where prominent examples of content are voice telephony, text messaging, video streaming, emails and files. The increase in volume and size of the content has driven the need for developing cellular standards that can handle continuously increasing data rates. However, is there another frontier to be tackled? Comparing the orders of magnitude of increase in data rate with the round-trip latency of interaction, the latter has not dropped much below the requirement for telephony. LTE achieves a typical round-trip latency of 25ms, still far beyond a maximum of 10ms to start enabling real-time wireless gaming. When moving to a round-trip latency of 1ms, and carrier grade robustness and availability, a new breakthrough in enabling unprecedented mobile applications becomes viable. These applications are coined "Tactile Internet", and will dramatically reshape our societies. The breakthrough is that we will be able to steer and control our real and virtual world around us with a tactile real-time interaction, without creating cyber-sickness. This will revolutionize education, mobility & traffic, health & care, sports, entertainment, gaming, and the smart grid, just to name some segments which can be seen today already.

 

To make this vision come true, the 1ms round-trip latency budget sets tight constraints on every element in the chain of communication and interaction. The physical and media-access control layer therefore can only contribute up to 100Ás, which clearly shows that LTE with a basic TTI (transmission time interval) of 1ms and an OFDM symbol of approximately 70Ás; is out of scope. Hence, a new physical layer needs to be created. On the one hand the benefits of multi-carrier should be preserved, but due to very short symbol durations we will see frequency selectivity per sub-carrier and inter-carrier interference. As the benefits of orthogonality are lost, alternative multi-carrier schemes must be found. We propose GFDM (Generalized Frequency Division Multiplexing), which allows for engineering signals packets in frequency and time, and for a transceiver implementations with little additional cost versus OFDM.

 


Bio:

Gerhard Fettweis earned his Ph.D. under H. Meyr's supervision from RWTH Aachen in 1990. After one year at IBM Research in San Jose, CA, he moved to TCSI Inc., Berkeley, CA. Since 1994 he is Vodafone Chair Professor at TU Dresden, Germany, with currently 20 companies from Asia/Europe/US sponsoring his research on wireless transmission and chip design. He coordinates 2 DFG centers at TU Dresden, cfAED and HAEC.Gerhard is IEEE Fellow, member of acatech, has an honorary doctorate from TU Tampere, and has received multiple awards. In Dresden he has spun-out ten start- ups, and setup funded projects of close to EUR 1/2 billion volume. He has helped organizing IEEE conferences, most notably as TPC Chair of IEEE ICC 2009, IEEE TTM 2012, and General Chair of VTC Spring 2013 and DATE 2014.

 

Go to top     Go to the technical program page →

 


 

Prof. Sabine Susstrunk
École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne(EPFL), Switzerland
 
Title : Moving beyond RGB
Chair : Abhay Karandikar
Date : March 2, 2014
Timings : 09:15 - 10:15
Venue : L-16 (Lecture Hall Complex)
     

Abstract:
Information theory and signal processing have classically used the notion of "side information" to formally describe and analyze situations where providing more information to either the encoding or the decoding process improves system performance. We consider and extend this viewpoint to modern day imaging systems, where in addition to images representing visual information, devices also capture a variety of side information. In the ubiquitous smartphone, for example, multiple sensors (microphone, GPS, accelerometer, compass, etc.) augment the two cameras that have become the norm. Additionally, these devices are usually connected to a large network of digital data. This rich "side information" can improve the performance of imaging applications and enable completely new functionality. Using research examples from our group, ranging from near-infrared, location coordinates, big data to semantics, we present applications of how such "side information" enables functionality and improvements in computational photography and
computer vision applications.

 

Bio:

Prof. Sabine Süsstrunk (http://ivrg.epfl.ch/people/susstrunk) leads the Image and Visual Representation Group (IVRG) at the School of Information and Communication Sciences at Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) since 1999. Her research interests are in computational photography, multimedia, color image processing and computer vision, and image quality. She has authored and co-authored over 120 publications, of which 6 have received best paper/demo awards, and holds 7 patents. She received the IS&T/SPIE 2013 Electronic Imaging Scientist of the Year Award for her contributions to color imaging, computational photography, and image quality.

 

 

Go to top     Go to the technical program page →